Return to Yesterday

I’ve put the original Facets of Fantasy back into print and added a Kindle ebook. Wonder why I did this? Here’s a piece of background information: I published this book 7 years ago. Which means I was writing it 8-9 years ago. It was my first foray into making my stories public, and when I returned to it, now a total stranger, I was startled by the energy coming out of the book.

facets-front-cover

I was insecure when I first started out, of course. What writer isn’t? But I was really, really excited too. I wanted to tell stories and I wanted to get them out there for people to read. Sure, the book was amateur in countless ways. Seeing it now as if it had been written by somebody else–ah, the blessings of aging, right?–I see loads of editing flaws, awkward sentences, melodrama, hilarious moments that I hadn’t meant to be hilarious, and more. I shake my head over it. But I also see a zest that I hadn’t realized I’d lost.

The original version of Facets of Fantasy, published in 2009. Contains 5 sci-fi and fantasy novellas, including the early versions of The Trouble with Taranui, The Amulet of Renari, and Millhaven Castle (Millhaven Castle was later rewritten as “Alyce.”) Rewritten versions of the other stories appear in the more recent Facets of Fantasy: A Collection.

This book has not been edited and is not a professional publication. It is a reference for comparison with the later versions of Facets of Fantasy.

Halogen Crossing; The Trouble with Taranui; Jurant; The Amulet of Renari; Millhaven Castle

I spent the next 7 years rewriting these stories in an effort to get people to “like” them. Although I published often, only Victoria and Ryan and Essie were really new. I got obsessed–which must mean these stories were important to me–with having the Facets stories approved by some invisible committee. I was wasting my time.

If you’d like to read it as a comparison to my writing since, be my guest. It’s different from the others, so in several cases it is like reading new tales, which  lessens the element of deja vu.

 

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